Reviews

Review: The Kiss Quotient ~ by Helen Hoang

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Review: The Kiss Quotient ~ by Helen Hoang

336 pages ~ Contemporary Romance   

June 5, 2018 ~ Berkley

My Rating: 4/5

Goodreads Description:

Stella Lane thinks math is the only thing that unites the universe. She comes up with algorithms to predict customer purchases — a job that has given her more money than she knows what to do with, and way less experience in the dating department than the average thirty-year-old.

It doesn’t help that Stella has Asperger’s and French kissing reminds her of a shark getting its teeth cleaned by pilot fish. Her conclusion: she needs lots of practice — with a professional. Which is why she hires escort Michael Phan. The Vietnamese and Swedish stunner can’t afford to turn down Stella’s offer, and agrees to help her check off all the boxes on her lesson plan — from foreplay to more-than-missionary position…

Before long, Stella not only learns to appreciate his kisses, but to crave all the other things he’s making her feel. Soon, their no-nonsense partnership starts making a strange kind of sense. And the pattern that emerges will convince Stella that love is the best kind of logic...

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My Thoughts:  

What can I say about this book that hasn’t already been said?! Ok, I’ll give it a try…..

Like so many people, I found Stella and Michael’s story to be super sweet, funny, sexy, heartwarming, but also really inspiring. It was difficult at first watching both of these characters beat up on themselves for their perceived “flaws.” They’re both such genuine, honest, and loveable people, but I wanted them to love themselves as much as I loved them. It was frustrating at times that they didn’t realize their own awesomeness. However, this frustration ultimately gave way to inspiration when I saw them come together to battle for each other and for their own dreams.

This book will restore your faith in the healing power of love!

Here are a few highlights for me:

  • It was so interesting and insightful to read a book from an autistic perceptive, written by an autistic author. This really helped me better understand the struggles and the unique way people on the spectrum see the world. Getting inside Stella’s head- her work obsession, her daily routine, her approach to love and communication- this was all so fascinating and was by far my favorite element of the book
  • The sex scenes were actually about love and connection – there was no weird power play or struggle for dominance, everything is very tender and romantic
  • Michael’s family – I really loved the connection to Michael’s mom, sisters, grandma, and cousins. Not only were they all adorable and hilarious, but it was also a really cool look into a Vietnamese/American family. This also highlighted the cultural difference between Michael and Stella and how beautifully they were able to come together.  

Overall, I really loved this book. The only downfall for me was that I found it difficult at times to relate to Stella. However, this did not deter from my enjoyment or my appreciation for Stella as a character. If you are interested in other books that center around autistic characters, The Girl He Used to Know by Tracey Garvis-Graves is also wonderful.

Happy Reading!!

For more information on Helen Hoang and her books, check her out on Goodreads

Follow me on Instagram @somewhereinpages & Goodreads @erinrossi

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Reviews

Review: ACR- Passion on Park Ave. ~ by Lauren Layne

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Review: Passion on Park Avenue (The Central park Pact Vol. 1) ~ by Lauren Layne  

288 pages (Paperback) ~ Romance/Woman’s Fiction   

May 28th, 2019 ~ Gallery Books

My Rating: 3/5 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Goodreads Description:

For as long as she can remember, Bronx-born Naomi Powell has had one goal: to prove her worth among the Upper East Side elite—the same people for which her mom worked as a housekeeper. Now, as the strong-minded, sassy CEO of one of the biggest jewelry empires in the country, Naomi finally has exactly what she wants—but it’s going to take more than just the right address to make Manhattan’s upper class stop treating her like an outsider.

The worst offender is her new neighbor, Oliver Cunningham—the grown son of the very family Naomi’s mother used to work for. Oliver used to torment Naomi when they were children, and as a ridiculously attractive adult, he’s tormenting her in entirely different ways. Now they find themselves engaged in a battle-of-wills that will either consume or destroy them…

Filled with charm and heart and plenty of sex and snark, this entertaining series will hook you from the very first page.

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Note: I received a digital ARC of Passion on Park Avenue from Gallery Books via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you Gallery Books & NetGalley.

img_1883My Thoughts:

Passion on Park Avenue was a super fun, sexy read. I read it in one sitting and while I did find fault with a few things, overall, I enjoyed it.

Highlights for me:

  • The sexy banter between Naomi and Oliver had me laughing out loud through the entire book. The sexual tension and chemistry between the two made this the highlight of the book for me.
  • I also really loved the New York scenes and the juxtaposition between Park Ave and the Bronx. I’m always a sucker for a good New York setting.
  • Oliver was just adorable. He was smart, kind, devoted to his family, and loyal. I found myself relating more to him in this book than to Naomi, which usually never happens for me.
  • The “real life” struggles that Oliver and Naomi have to face- caring for sick parents, etc. was a refreshing departure from typical romance novels.

What I didn’t love:

  • The three friends, Claire, Naomi, and Audrey, become friends really quickly and in a super unrealistic way. I didn’t mind the unrealistic part because I’m not really looking for reality when I read, but the set up of their friendship could have been done better. They seemed to just randomly stumble into each other in Central Park, discover each other’s identities and decide “hey, we should be friends.” This was really hard to swallow. I think that the friendship between the three women could have been better set up and established. It just felt so awkward and forced.
  • There was a constant mention of fashion labels. I get that the author is trying to establish that Naomi has money, but the constant mention of “Chloe” bag and “Chanel” sunglasses became so distracting.
  • The beginning starts with a death and there were completely crass mentions of death and hell by the main character that really turned me off.
  • There were a lot of inconsistencies in the story- ie: characters who had supposedly never meet knew more than they should about each other. There was also a lot of repetition. The main characters having the same observations again and again – I hope some of these errors get worked out before the final edition is published.
  • A lot of cliches – for example- Naomi states that she wants to wear red high heels because that is the opposite of what a “good girl” would wear. What!? Who says “good girls” don’t wear red high heels?
  • Naomi was immature and annoying at times. There were times when I really liked her, but also times when I found her super annoying.
  • Steamy scenes did not deliver enough steam. There was a lot of build up, but very little delivery.

Overall, I enjoyed it- It was a nice palette cleanser and a fun distraction. This story is a perfect vacation or beach read! It comes out May 28th! Just in time was Summer!

For more information on Lauren Layne and her books, check her out on Goodreads 

Follow me on Instagram @somewhereinpages & Goodreads @erinrossi

Reviews

Review: ARC- The Girl He Used to Know ~ by Tracey Garvis Graves

Review: ARC- The Girl He Used to Know ~ by Tracey Garvis Graves

304 pages (Hardcover) ~ Literary Fiction/Romance   

April 2nd, 2019 ~ St. Martin’s Press

My Rating: 4/5 Stars

Goodreads Description:

Annika (rhymes with Monica) Rose is an English major at the University of Illinois. Anxious in social situations where she finds most people’s behavior confusing, she’d rather be surrounded by the order and discipline of books or the quiet solitude of playing chess.

Jonathan Hoffman joined the chess club and lost his first game–and his heart–to the shy and awkward, yet brilliant and beautiful Annika. He admires her ability to be true to herself, quirks and all, and accepts the challenges involved in pursuing a relationship with her. Jonathan and Annika bring out the best in each other, finding the confidence and courage within themselves to plan a future together. What follows is a tumultuous yet tender love affair that withstands everything except the unforeseen tragedy that forces them apart, shattering their connection and leaving them to navigate their lives alone.

Now, a decade later, fate reunites Annika and Jonathan in Chicago. She’s living the life she wanted as a librarian. He’s a Wall Street whiz, recovering from a divorce and seeking a fresh start. The attraction and strong feelings they once shared are instantly rekindled, but until they confront the fears and anxieties that drove them apart, their second chance will end before it truly begins.

 

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My Thoughts:  

I read The Girl I Used to Know in one sitting. These two characters captured my heart from the start and would not let go. At first, it seemed to be following the typical trope of a college couple reuniting after years apart, but this story became anything but typical. Reading this book was an emotional, heartwarming, and inspiring experience for me.

The writing is really smart and thoughtful. The story alternates between Annika’s and Jonathan’s perspectives and between two different time periods-  both characters have their own unique voice that is true to their character. Their voices change and grow over the years and really shows the full arc of their characters. Getting to read the unique perspective and understanding of Annika- who is on the autism spectrum- really endeared me toward her. It was really heartwarming to see her grow over the course of the novel and command more agency in her own life. I absolutely fell in love with her character- crying when she was struggling and rooting for her success. It was heartbreaking to read, but also really refreshing and inspiring at the same time.

“I remember feeling stunned when Tina explained that most people draw these conclusions instantaneously, without any extra analysis at all. How amazing but also heartbreaking, because I’ll never be one of them.”Annika

  • The support that Annika receives from those that love her- her parents, Janice, her brother, and Jonathan-  really shows that it is not about those that try to bring you down for your differences, but the precious few that love you because of your differences.

“I’m trying to explain that the way you navigate the world will never be more important than the type of person you are.” Jonathan

My only complaint was that the climax and resolution both seemed a little rushed. I wanted the long, super sappy, drawn-out ending, but I was still really happy with the ending overall. This story has a powerful and heartwarming message that I think will resonate with everyone. It hits bookstores on April 2nd!!

For more information on Tracey Garvis Graves and her books, check her out on Goodreads.

Note: I received an E-ARC of The Girl He Used to Know from St. Martin’s Press via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Follow me on Instagram @somewhereinpages & Goodreads @erinrossi

Reviews

Review: The Black Coats ~ by Colleen Oakes

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Review: The Black Coats ~ by Colleen Oakes  

376 pages (Hardbound) ~ YA Fiction  

2019~ Harper Teen

My Rating: 4/5 Stars

Goodreads Description:

The deeply secretive Black Coats have been exacting vengeance on men who hurt girls and women for years. And Thea has just received an invitation to join them. This is the opportunity she’s been waiting for to finally get justice for her cousin Natalie, whose killer went free.

Thea dives head first into the group, training every day with other girls whose stories rival hers. Together they carry out Balancings—acts of revenge guaranteed to teach a lesson. With every predator threatened, every blackmailer exposed, and every date rapist punished, Thea can feel herself getting closer to avenging Natalie’s death.

But then the Balancings begin to escalate in brutality, and Thea discovers that the Black Coats are not all they seem to be. Thea must confront just how far she’s willing to go for justice—and what kind of justice Natalie, and Thea herself, deserve. Because when the line between justice and revenge is razor thin, it’s hard not to get cut.

“Soulevez-vous, femmes de la vengeance”

“Raise up, women of revenge”

My Thoughts:  

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Even though the synopsis was really intriguing, The Black Coats is not typically the type of YA a book that I would ever pick up. I generally stick to fantasy and dystopian when I venture into YA territory. But isn’t that the point of a reading challenge- encouraging you to read things that you would never have picked up otherwise? I think so, and I am actually really glad that I picked this up. It has a really interesting and unique concept, one that I have heard many people call “unrealistic,” but I am definitely not looking for reality in my books, so I was ok with that. The Black Coats are a vigilante group of women who hold various positions of power in their Community. The community, in this case, is Austin, TX. They’re sworn to right the wrongs done to women. In other words- they take matters into their own hands when the law fails to punish men for their crimes against women. They also have a long history that reaches back generations and influence that reaches beyond Austin. They reminded me of ninja-witches (minus the magic). Instead of using magic to achieve their goals, they use their physical prowess and the numerous skills of the women in their secret organization- lawyers, policewomen, politicians, etc. However, they are not a perfect organization. I loved that the reader was meant to question this from the start. Our main character, Thea, who is a funny, endearing, and typical 17-year-old, quickly starts to see the issues within the organization, but she grapples with the notion that they are also administering “justice.” The book brings up a lot of interesting questions – The most valuable bring – vengeance vs justice. Can revenge ever really buy true justice or bring peace? Will revenge lessen the grief of losing someone you love? These are all questions that the characters have to figure out for themselves which was something I felt we could all relate to. Despite the seriousness of these issues, Thea is still able to find real purpose, friendship, and clarity as a member. Ultimately, the book has a very hopeful message about what women, and men, can accomplish through true friendship and understanding.

What I didn’t love:

  • One complaint was that certain plot points were a little predictable- there was a lot of foreshadowing and certain elements just seemed inevitable. 
  • I also would have liked more history on The Black Coat National organization- I get that there is only so much room in a book for Oakes to explore all of this, but I had a lot of questions about the organization outside of Austen and I felt like that would have been a really fascinating connection.

Possible trigger warnings here: rape, domestic violence

Overall, I really enjoyed it- It was a quick read with a really interesting message and I would definitely recommend it to other YA readers.

For more information on Colleen Oakes and her books, check her out on Goodreads and Instagram

Note: I received a copy of The Black Coats from BookSparks in exchange for an honest review and as a #YAWRC2019 ambassador. Thank you so much BookSparks.

Follow me on Instagram @somewhereinpages & Goodreads @erinrossi

Reviews

Review: ARC- Daisy Jones and the Six ~ by Taylor Jenkins Reid

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Review: ARC: Daisy Jones and the Six ~ by Taylor Jenkins Reid  

349 pages (paperback ARC) ~ Historical Fiction/Literary Fiction  

March 5th, 2019~ Ballantine Books (an imprint of Random House)

My Rating: 4/5 Stars

Goodreads Description:

Everyone knows Daisy Jones & The Six, but nobody knows the reason behind their split at the absolute height of their popularity . . . until now.

Daisy is a girl coming of age in L.A. in the late sixties, sneaking into clubs on the Sunset Strip, sleeping with rock stars, and dreaming of singing at the Whisky a Go Go. The sex and drugs are thrilling, but it’s the rock and roll she loves most. By the time she’s twenty, her voice is getting noticed, and she has the kind of heedless beauty that makes people do crazy things.

Also getting noticed is The Six, a band led by the brooding Billy Dunne. On the eve of their first tour, his girlfriend Camila finds out she’s pregnant, and with the pressure of impending fatherhood and fame, Billy goes a little wild on the road.

Daisy and Billy cross paths when a producer realizes that the key to supercharged success is to put the two together. What happens next will become the stuff of legend.

The making of that legend is chronicled in this riveting and unforgettable novel, written as an oral history of one of the biggest bands of the seventies. Taylor Jenkins Reid is a talented writer who takes her work to a new level with Daisy Jones & The Six, brilliantly capturing a place and time in an utterly distinctive voice.

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My Thoughts:  

I wanted to read this book the minute that I read the synopsis…..late 70s, Rock-n-Roll, LA….sign me up! I loved The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo, so knew that Taylor Jenkins-Reid would do justice to this amazing concept. Because of all of the hype surrounding this book, getting an ARC proved to be rather difficult for me. Luckily, the lovely ladies at BookSparks hooked me. And I am so glad that I was able to read it. This book is definitely worth all of the hype it’s been getting. It is entertaining, fast-paced, and fun, while still managing to be really complex and thought-provoking.

Here are a few of my highlights:

  • Themes– the book dealt with a lot of heavy themes: addiction, childhood trauma, and the power of choice, just to name a few. These characters are broken in so many ways, and they go through so much together. However, they still manage to look out for each other no matter what.
  • I like the way that Jenkins-Reid was able to portray addiction as something that one never really recovers from. It is a constant choice day to day. She also uses this theme of choice in order to show that it is not what we desire or what we think of doing that defines us, but rather what we actually end up doing. Our choices define us, rather than our addictions. Both of these themes were explored so well and were really powerful when placed in the context of celebrities who have a world of choices at their fingertips.

“History is what you did, not what you almost did, not what you thought about doing. And I was proud of what I did.”

  • The Music- The process of creating music in the 70s, lyrics, instruments, mixing, producing, all without the technology we have today, was all explored so well here and in such detail. It was so cool to be behind the scenes of this creative process. It was even better than watching “Behind the Music” because you feel like a member of the band.
  • Imperfect love- The idea that love doesn’t have to be perfect in order to be true and real was another theme explored here. There was part of me that really wanted to scream at these characters for making the mistakes that they do, but the story really makes to acknowledge that people and relationships aren’t perfect and that is ok. This really made me rethink strongly held beliefs.

“No matter who you choose to go down the road with, you’re gonna get hurt. That’s just the nature of caring about someone. No matter who you love, they will break your heart along the way….But I just kept choosing trust and hope. I believed he was worthy of it.”

What I didn’t love:

  • Interview style- I didn’t care for the interview style of the book. I would have liked if the interview style was mixed in with actual prose. The interview style made the book move really fast, which was great, but I felt that more depth would have come from prose.
  • Predictability- because it was an interview style, there was a lot of heavy foreshadowing by the characters who are telling the story. This made the climax of the story a little predictable for me.

Overall, it was a great ride. I would recommend this book to pretty much everyone, but especially those that love the 1970s Rock-n-Roll scene.

For more information on Taylor Jenkins Reid and her books, check her out on Goodreads and Instagram

Note: I received a copy of the ARC for Daisy Jones and the Six from BookSparks in exchange for an honest review. Thank you so much BookSparks.

Follow me on Instagram @somewhereinpages & Goodreads @erinrossi

Reviews

Review: ARC of Queenie ~ by Candice Carty-Williams

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Review: Queenie ~ by Candice Carty-Williams

Pages 336 (hardbound) ~ Gallery/Scout Press

March 19th, 2019 – Adult Contemporary

My Rating: 4.5/5

Goodreads Description:

Queenie Jenkins is a 25-year-old Jamaican British woman living in London, straddling two cultures and slotting neatly into neither. She works at a national newspaper, where she’s constantly forced to compare herself to her white middle-class peers. After a messy break up from her long-term white boyfriend, Queenie seeks comfort in all the wrong places…including several hazardous men who do a good job of occupying brain space and a bad job of affirming self-worth.

As Queenie careens from one questionable decision to another, she finds herself wondering, “What are you doing? Why are you doing it? Who do you want to be?”—all of the questions today’s woman must face in a world trying to answer them for her.

Note: Thank you to Gallery Books and NetGalley for providing me with the ARC of Queenie in exchange for an honest review. Opinions are all mine.

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My Thoughts:

Queenie is described as being “Bridget Jones meets Americanah.” I haven’t yet read Americanah, but I feel like comparing this book to Bridget Jones doesn’t quite do it justice. Don’t get me wrong, I love Bridget Jones, but while Bridget is dealing with one bad man and silly parents, Queenie is dealing with much more serious issues. It definitely has a similar type of humor and it does deal with Queenie’s many sexual exploits, but underneath the humor, this novel tackles some really heavy and honest issues.

Queenie is a smart, young journalist who wants to use her unique voice to bring awareness to issues that matter to her. Her work as a journalist, so far, has only allowed her to write on trivial matters. But Queenie longs to write about more important topics: Black Lives Matter, police brutality, discrimination, etc. However, Queenie struggles under the weight of this burden because she is simultaneously dealing with the pain of a recent breakup, anxiety, her own racial identity, and a traumatic childhood that she has never really faced. It is painful at times watching her struggle on this journey, but it is also a really hopeful story of self-love, acceptance, friendship, and family.

Queenie’s family and friends were my absolute favorite part of this novel. Her Grandparents (“the water rates!”), her Aunt, her cousin, her mom…they are all such funny, unique, and loveable characters. And I really hope that Queenie’s best friend, Kyazike, is based on a real person because she is just to perfect not to be. I love that each of these characters plays their own unique role in helping Queenie heal.

The therapy sessions were some of the most interesting moments in the novel. We really get inside Queenie’s head here and we also start to see the healing process unfolding. The therapist, Janet, was also such a great balance to Queenie and their dynamic was great to read. I also loved the “Dame it, Janet” Rocky Horror reference. I loved that Queenie ultimately got better due to the therapy, which I think goes a long way in breaking down the stigma that is sometimes attached to therapy.

I relate to so many of Queenie’s struggles, but there is no way that I could possibly relate to all of them. Reading this book opened up a whole new type of understanding for me, and I honestly feel like a better person having read it. I completely believe that everyone will find something worth holding on to in Queenie’s journey.

Queenie comes out March 19!!

For more information on Candice Carty- Williams and her books, check her out on Goodreads & Instagram

Follow me on Instagram @somewhereinpages & Goodreads @erinrossi

Reviews

Review: ARC – The Last Romantics ~ by Tara Conklin

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Review: The Last Romantics ~ by Tara Conklin

386 pages ~ Literary Fiction

Feb 5th, 2019 ~ William Morrow Books

My Rating: 4/5 ✰✰✰✰

Goodreads Description:

When the renowned poet Fiona Skinner is asked about the inspiration behind her iconic work, The Love Poem, she tells her audience a story about her family and a betrayal that reverberates through time.

It begins in a big yellow house with a funeral, an iron poker, and a brief variation forever known as the Pause: a free and feral summer in a middle-class Connecticut town. Caught between the predictable life they once led and an uncertain future that stretches before them, the Skinner siblings—fierce Renee, sensitive Caroline, golden boy Joe and watchful Fiona—emerge from the Pause staunchly loyal and deeply connected. Two decades later, the siblings find themselves once again confronted with a family crisis that tests the strength of these bonds and forces them to question the life choices they’ve made and ask what, exactly, they will do for love.

A sweeping yet intimate epic about one American family, The Last Romantics is an unforgettable exploration of the ties that bind us together, the responsibilities we embrace and the duties we resent, and how we can lose—and sometimes rescue—the ones we love. A novel that pierces the heart and lingers in the mind, it is also a beautiful meditation on the power of stories—how they navigate us through difficult times, help us understand the past, and point the way toward our future.

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“The greatest works of poetry, what makes each of us a poet, are the stories we tell about ourselves. We create them out of family and blood and friends and love and hate and what we’ve read and watched and witnessed. Longing and regret, illness, broken bones, broken hearts, achievements, money won and lost, palm readings and visions. We tell these stories until we believe them.”

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My Thoughts:  

The Last Romantics is such a wonderful study in contrasts. The story of The Skinner siblings feels, at times, to be sweeping and epic, however, nothing beyond what we can expect from an ordinary life happens to these characters. Their lives and loves are both extraordinary and ordinary at the same time. Conklin manages to portray the complexity of sibling love and shows how powerful and true it is, despite all of its flaws. Her writing is both subtle and powerful and really celebrates “ordinary” human life. The writing is raw and unromantic, but still heartwrenching and beautiful. “True love” in all of its forms, is true because it is flawed, and because it is essentially “human.” This book does such an amazing job of celebrating this. I can’t say enough about how much I loved this book.

Below are a few themes that really stood out to me:

The Poetry- Fiona, the youngest of The Skinner siblings and narrator, is a poet and Conklin manages to seamlessly incorporate elements of poetry that both moves that plot forward and adds to our understanding of these characters. The poetry itself was beautiful, but also added such an interesting layer to the novel.

Representations of Grief and Depression- I really liked that Conklin didn’t shy away from a true portrayal of Noni’s grief and depression during “The Pause.” There is nothing mysterious or vailed about her experience. It is gritty and raw but also tinged with moments of beauty. Grief acts as a constant companion to these characters and changes them in profound ways which is something that I really related to and appreciated.

The connection between Parent and Child- The Skinner siblings come together and pull apart throughout the course of the novel. Their shared experiences and trauma bring them closer together, and yet their individual struggles seem to pull them apart. Their desire to protect Noni is a constant source of connection as well. I thought that Conklin really portrayed this complicated connection beautifully.

“We forgave Noni not because she was all we had, although this was true, but because we shared her. She belonged to the four of us, and for one to forgive her meant that the others couldn’t either, and none of us was willing to shoulder the burden of that decision. None of us could bear to take Noni away from the others again.”

Drawback:

The only slight drawback for me was the third person narrative style told by Fiona. I really enjoyed the flashbacks told from Fiona’s POV when it involved her own life. However, when she was narrating for her brother and her sisters, it did, at times, become distracting and kept pulling me away from the story. I started to question how Fiona knew enough of these details to relay the personal intimate experiences of her sibilings. I liked Fiona as the primary narrator, but I feel that Joe, Renee, and Caroline’s experiences would have been better told from their own POV, rather than Fiona’s.

Overall, this was a wonderful and moving story about the triumphs of family and of “true love” with all of its wonderful flaws. The Last Romantics comes out today, February 5th, 2019. Be sure to grab a copy of this amazing family drama.

I was graciously provided an ARC of The Last Romantics by Williams Morrow/Harper Collins, however, these opinions are all mine.

Happy Reading!!

For more information on Tara Conklin and her books, check her out on Goodreads

Follow me on Instagram @somewhereinpages & Goodreads @erinrossi